These Photos Give a Glimpse of the Life of Mexican Migrant Workers in the 1950s

These Photos Give a Glimpse of the Life of Mexican Migrant Workers in the 1950s
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In the 1950s, when legions of men left the labor market to fight in World War II, the U.S. initiated the Bracero Program, a series of laws and agreements with Mexico to provide famer labor for the northern country.

In 1957, photojournalist Sid Avery of the Saturday Evening Post produced a photo essay of the Bracero program, documenting the men in their several states: being unjustly fumigated with DDT, a dangerous insecticide that is now banned, by U.S. medics, performing arduous tasks, eating, laughing and playing cards with other workers.

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The long-forgotten images were recently unearthed by the photo agency MPTV and published in TIME magazine.

For a glimpse of the controversial program, which brought more than 400,000 Mexican laborers to the U.S. annually, head over to the news magazine's site.